It All Falls Apart: Anna’s Transmedia Log

A Collection of Leaves by Anna Smith

A Collection of Leaves by Anna Smith

 

Anna Smith (@anna_phd) is currently an IES postdoctoral fellow in writing and new learning ecologies at the University of Illinois, Urbana, Champaign. She is fascinated with the learning pathways that people form across their lives. You can find the bulk of her digital writing online at developingwriters.org.

This is a fail log. This is also a process log. It is a reflection point that is full of possibilities. For almost two months, as I worked with video footage, mosaic pieces, dancers, editing software, books, game platforms, words, etc., I repeatedly failed in composing a transmedia piece (itself called ‘pieces’).

And at each juncture, I tinkered, worked around, asked for help, geeked out, threw up my hands and walked away, and/or decided to have the piece ‘say’ something else. I found that transmedia composition required a new degree of persistence, and that these were some of the textures of that persistence.

Transmedia by Anna Smith

Transmedia by Anna Smith

 

Anna’s Transmedia Process Log: Reflection in Progress

Reflective Practice / Join the Conversation

An Activity: Make Writing … Digital

Has your vision for a digital piece this month hit some expected and unexpected walls, either due to limitations of technology or some other logistical quagmire? Consider sharing out your reflection on that process and help us learn from each other.

We hope you will share your work across the various Digital Writing Month spaces that you inhabit. That could be right here at the Digital Writing Month blog; at your own blog or writing space; on Twitter with the #DigiWriMo hashtag; in the DigiWriMo Google Plus Community; at the DigiWriMo Facebook page; or wherever you find yourself writing digitally.

 

Pieces: A Study in Transmedia

Pieces by Anna Smith

Pieces by Anna Smith

Anna Smith (@anna_phd) is currently an IES postdoctoral fellow in writing and new learning ecologies at the University of Illinois, Urbana, Champaign. She is fascinated with the learning pathways that people form across their lives. You can find the bulk of her digital writing online at developingwriters.org.

pieces: a study in transmedia

Like our learning, our digital writing stretches across and is informed by the stuff of our everyday lives–the things, ideas, and experiences that we make and which make us. We bring all that we are, were, and imagine ourselves and our world to be to a piece of digital writing, a piece that is dancing along its own pathway across media, platforms, intentions, world-views, etc.

Press play below to weave with me, to bring the pieces that are surfacing in your life in conversation with those that are materializing in mine. As a transmedia exploration, I hope you see the pieces you come across and the pathways you make as materials of/for composing–quite literally.

(Note from editor: be patient with the loading of this file. Anna’s immersive project has plenty of embedded media experiences. It’s worth the load time.)

I invite us to consider how in transmedia, it is not just media across which a piece moves, but also meanings, modalities, motives, persons, processes, pasts, etc. To contribute a piece to this study in transmedia, please add to this padlet.

An Activity: Make Writing … Digital

Tinker yourself with the beta version of the new online version of Twine, a free interactive story/writing platform, and create your own set of wanderings and evocations. How do the branches and connections within and without a story expand the notions of writing? Explore with Twine. Play your story.

We hope you will share your work across the various Digital Writing Month spaces that you inhabit. That could be right here at the Digital Writing Month blog; at your own blog or writing space; on Twitter with the #DigiWriMo hashtag; in the DigiWriMo Google Plus Community; at the DigiWriMo Facebook page; or wherever you find yourself writing digitally.

Your Voice in Mine

Anna Smith is an educational researcher and teacher educator blogging about composition in the digital age, contexts for learning, theories of development, and global youth. In this piece, she ponders the way that audience and author get blended in digital writing, and wishes DigiWriMo a fond farewell.

Your Voice in Mine

by Anna Smith

How can I hear my own voice unless it bounces off of yours?

I have had that single line in my mind for years. It isn’t particularly poetic, and I don’t completely agree with what it implies, but I’ve tried relentlessly to write the poem I hear inside it. It has something to do with the way the masses in NYC weave, avoid, embrace. I wrote another line once trying to get near it:

As a child I would drag my fingers through water or hold my arm out car windows to feel this–this particle rumba, this caressing, this giving and taking of space.

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