Digiwrimo: (re)draw the routine

Tanya Lau (@tanyalau)  By day, I am usually implementing online learning initiatives at a large government agency in Sydney. At other times, I can be found exploring and experiencing life with my son, erratically connecting with intriguing people on the internet, facilitating edcontexts.org, and occasionally trying to complete a masters dissertation. I tweet as @tanyalau and blog at explorationsinlearning.wordpress.com

Lights through a rainy window

flickr photo by RichK   shared under a Creative Commons (BY-SA) license

When I first started thinking about this post, I imagined I might try to create an activity that explored the use of visuals to communicate in some sort of weird and interesting way, artistic, fun and far removed – a distraction from? – the routine, mundane writing that we’re all required to do, day to day as part of our day to day work, in the office or at home: reports, emails, briefing notes, specifications documents, forms, essays, research papers, dissertations…

Handwritten words: #DIGIWRIMO "visual" theme post[Image: DigiwriMo post header, by @tanyalau]
Doodle of words Creative, Art, Weird and some ???

[Image: DigiwriMo weird art?, by @tanyalau]

But as I started thinking about what that activity might be, my mind kept returning to a tweet from my friend Bruno – something he said when he was deciding whether or not to participate in #digiwrimo:

Handwritten text of above tweet

[Image: Bruno’s DigiWriMo tweet, by @tanyalau]

It’s been nagging at me, because it’s making me think: well, why shouldn’t or couldn’t #digiwrimo help directly with our routine or work-related writing – rather than being seen as a distraction preventing us from getting back to the *real* writing?

Words: Why Not Digiwrimo helps with job work writing?

[Image: DigiwriMo why not?, by @tanyalau]

So I started thinking about the types of everyday writing and communication that I do, and remembered some of the things I’d seen recently from people who are doing inspiring things to make these types of writing and communication more visual, interesting, engaging – and, ultimately more effective:

Words: inspiration. Nick Sousanis, sketchnoting, doctoral thesis

[Image: DigiwriMo inspiration, by @tanyalau]

Nick Sousanisgraphic novel Doctoral dissertation:

Hand drawn male head with scarf round face

[Image from Sousanis, N (2015) ‘Unflattening’ http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674744431 via Studio 99 ‘Unflattened’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5SicXrnOYU]

Hand drawn Mona Lisa

Silhouette of girl

[Images: from Sousanis, N (2015) ‘Unflattening’ http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674744431 via http://boingboing.net/2015/06/21/doctoral-dissertation-in-graph.html]

Conference sketchnoters

Image of sketchnotes

[Image: Twitter search #sketchnote, photos https://twitter.com/search?f=images&vertical=default&q=%23sketchnote&src=typd, retrieved 29th October, 2015]

Visual reports….like this example from Toby Hewitt, who reported the results of his training needs analysis as an infographic.

Infographic

[Image: Training Needs Analysis infographic by Toby Hewitt https://image-store.slidesharecdn.com/fecb4066-0dec-4ec6-9a88-a3d8f4a730b8-original.png via LinkedIn status update, September 2015 https://www.linkedin.com/nhome/updates?topic=6050060917800984576&]

The question I then asked myself was:

“How could I apply or adapt this type of visual thinking to my own work-related writing to improve communication, learning, engagement or understanding?”

How could I apply this to my own work?

[Image: DigiwriMo how can I apply these ideas?, by @tanyalau]

During digiwrimo, I’m going to take these ideas, adapt and hack them to my own situation; to take a document, a meeting, a conversation, an email, tweet, post, blog comment, report, shopping list, reminder note (anything!) – routine writing or communication that I do on a daily basis – and explore and experiment with it to find new, different and interesting ways to interpret and communicate its message primarily using visuals. (Starting with attempting to sketchnote this post).

Another thing I’ve been wanting to do more for a while is to experiment, play with and explore, and use digital tools for creating sketchnotes, infographics and data visualisation. Seeing as #digiwrimo = digital writing month, I’m going to use this opportunity to give myself the kick up the backside I need to actually Do It – and to share my endeavours and experiments with the #digiwrimo community.

I will try

[Image: DigiwriMo visual thinking, by @tanyalau]

And, in the spirit of digiwrimo, I’d like to encourage you to do the same.

More visual thinking inspiration

Visual notetaking in 3rd grade:

http://theasideblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/sketchnotes-visual-note-taking-in-3rd.html

Nick Sousanis’ experiment in visual thinking:

http://spinweaveandcut.com/unflattening/

Thinking differently using sketchnotes:

http://theasideblog.blogspot.com/2012/09/sketchnotes-visual-thinking-different.html

Ideas for creating visual notes:

http://uxmastery.com/sketchnoting-101-how-to-create-awesome-visual-notes/

A story about letting go of fear and sharing ideas visually: 

http://sketchnotearmy.com/blog/2015/10/26/take-a-challenge-fear-not-then-deliver-niina-sauvolainen.html

Digital tools to experiment with

iPad apps for sketchnoting:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/12/top-ipad-apps-for-sketchnoting-and.html

Android sketchnoting apps:

http://www.layh.com/2014/11/10/sketchnotes-on-an-android-tablet/

10 free infographic tools:

http://www.creativebloq.com/infographic/tools-2131971

20 free data visualisation tools:

http://www.creativebloq.com/infographic/20-free-data-visualisation-tools-5133780