Your Voice: Another Dimension

Wendy Taleo (@wentale): I’ve got a curiosity that keeps me coming back for more. For DigiWriMo I’m ready for anything. I’m looking forward to connecting with the DigiWriMo community. My guest post is focussed on adding your voice to your writing and my other ongoing investigation is around the human aspect of writing and learning online. I’m happy when trying out new tech tools or new ways of doing things. I have a geeky side, poetry side, crafty side, funny bone and human side (*phew*). Apart from Twitter my blogging is split between here and here.

 Coloured bubbles of liquid

flickr photo by Cyberslayer http://flickr.com/photos/cyberslayer/3757514403 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-SA) license

What Am I?

Insulator

by Wendy Taleo 2015

 

 

I am made of British Porcelain

Travelled to Australia circa 1870

I hang out on the top of poles

I am a terrible conductor but with me

Your message goes the distance

Incoming Message

 

 

 

I am

an insulator used in The Overland Telegraph
“one of the greatest engineering feats”

Listen to this post here (7 mins)

Telegraph

Early 18th century: from French télégraphe, from télé- ‘at a distance’ + -graphe ‘written’

The Oxford Dictionary definition of the telegraph (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/telegraph) is applicable as I am writing this at a distance, to go a distance. It must have been amazing in 1872 to finally be able to send a message from Southern Australia to Darwin (3,200km) and across the continents to England in a matter of hours instead of months. As I tap this out on the glass like surface of a tablet the digitally enhanced clicking of the keys reminds me of sending pulses down the wire. Some of the 36,000 overland telegraph poles still stand in the desert lands as a silent monument to the lives of many that built and maintained this form of communication.

While we have dulled our sense of wonderment of such things, it’s still incredible to me that this article could be read all around the world from the time it’s published. Digital writing has gone well beyond only the urgent and important messages and now gives our stories freedom to be shared across the seas.

In hospital with a fractured finger and arm [I pick up the phone to record] I wonder how I can do my blog post for Digital Writing Month. I think about Simon Ensor’s post where he decides to record first and then transcribe as a way of making sense.

In order to really grasp what is going on, I resort to typing out transcripts of my audio captures.” Simon Ensor, 2015.

I find that my thoughts are not joined or developed enough (or maybe that was the pain killers working) but it did allow me to record ideas while eating my hospital lunch. I’m recovering at home now and it’s time to put these ideas together.

There are many ways to add sounds to two dimensional writing and to the online learning experience. In this post I’m concentrating on the most available and low tech tool – our voice. The journal article by Ozubko and MacLeod (2010) suggests a concept called a ‘production effect’. This shows a ‘substantial benefit to memory of having studied information aloud as opposed to silently’. They looked at people’s memory recall of items from a list of words after reading half a list silently and half a list out loud.  By speaking the words rather than just silently reading it the brain can recollect these items better. The produced text can stand out from the crowd of words that we read. By using our own voice to read aloud we can activate the words, make them distinctive and add another dimension to our learning.

What happens when we record our digital writing? Is it important to do so?

One benefit is the concentration required as we are aware of the collection of our voices ‘on record’. We can play it back and perhaps read along with it (that brings back memories of broadcast sing-alongs in school). It’s also available to share and our communication net is widened. More than just an accessibility function the recording of texts can play a critical part in developing writing.

Hearing your own writing brought to ‘life’ adds another dimension. In this recent example, Maha Abdelmoneim chose to record a reading of a blog post. On listening to her recording she said:

mahatweet

The sharing of the recording had impact not only on the author but others that listened. I listened to this before I saw the original post and it stayed with me. Kevin Hodgson commented: kevintweet

When I asked the author, Simon Ensor, whether he would change anything of the original piece after hearing the reading he said:

wendy tweet

Remix is another dimension that we can add to our writing. Visual, audio, video, more writing – it’s another way to examine our thoughts from a different angle.

From the forthcoming book chapter entitled “Academic Writing as Aesthetics Applied: Creative use of Technology to Support Multisensory Learning” (Lian, Kell, & Koo Yew Lie. 2015) this quote struck a chord with me.

The way we write is reflected in the way in which we speak written texts. Writing is not separate from the spoken text, nor are the prosodic structures simply pasted onto the writing in order to create spoken text. (Lian et al. 2015)

The study used a mechanism of examining the recordings of students reading their own academic writings as a way of improving their writing. The report concluded:

Students, therefore, are likely to benefit from tools that tap into their multisensory meaning-making systems and enable them to examine, in more than one way the communicative impact of their own texts. (Lian et al. 2015)

This is what we can strive for by using audio in the online context. Make it multisensory, make it more available to the mysterious process of sensemaking for each individual.

Woodblock

In this work I took words from a video transcript and turned them into sound. See the process for this exercise in this post. Does this add any value to the sense making? While it was fun to do and it may have some artistic application, it would need a decoder for this to assist with any communicative impact of the original message (like the Morse code/decoder process). The following examples are more in line with the ability of sound, in particular the voice, to enhance, create and aid sense making.

Mindful: Mary Oliver

In this collaborative work started by Scott Glass, I wrote a poem and later returned to record a number of segments written by others. I also recorded my own poem and linked it on the Padlet wall. The authors that I recorded felt ‘honoured’ that I had spent the time to do this. In the online world we can suffer that all encompassing malaise of silence from our digital writing. By recording the written word I could add another dimension to this already multifaceted work.

Armchair travel

http://etalesandstories.tumblr.com/post/123531901825/armchair-travels-scene-setting

In this example the recordings came first. The #adhocvoices project as part of the Connected Learning MOOC 2015 (#clmooc) encouraged participants to record their voice or environment as a way to connect with others. There were four recordings that I chose. They were immediate, evocative, environmental and from various corners of the world. I used this sensory input and wrote a poem to tie them all together.

Horizon

A beach at sunset with the words of the haiku

Perhaps my favourite example of multisensory work is Horizon – A Journey in 5 Parts where I take a haiku poem through a few different iterations and collaborate with others to add sound and visuals.

An Inspiration: Make Writing … Digital

I’ve shared the above works as examples of how to add your voice to your digital writing. A mixed bag of ideas, for sure. What you do depends on what you might like to achieve.

  • Do you want to make a piece of writing more memorable? Read it aloud. Do you want to honour the author in some way? Record and share it.
  • Do you want to improve your academic writing? Read your own text aloud, record it and listen to it.
  • Need some inspiration? Listen to a recording or sound track and then write your story.
  • Have a story but not in a place to write it down? Record it and transcribe later.

Until we figure out how to transcribe touch and smell into 1’s and 0’s we can use our voice to tap into our multisensory system and help the learning process. Use your voice and add another dimension to your learning.

We hope you will share your work across the various Digital Writing Month spaces that you inhabit. That could be right here at the Digital Writing Month blog; at your own blog or writing space; on Twitter with the #DigiWriMo hashtag; in the DigiWriMo Google Plus Community; at the DigiWriMo Facebook page; or wherever you find yourself writing digitally.

References

Lian, A.B., Kell, P. & Koo Yew Lie. (2015, forthcoming). Challenges in global learning: International contexts and cross-disciplinary perspectives. Cambridge Scholars Publishers, Cambridge, UK.

Markman, A. (2010) Say it loud: I’m creating a distinctive memory.

Ozubko, J. D., & MacLeod, C. M. (2010). The Production Effect in Memory: Evidence That Distinctiveness Underlies the Benefit. Journal Of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory & Cognition, 36(6), 1543-1547.

The Overland Telegraph